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There are 51 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Research".

1. Let's Talk About the Mistrust Trans Community Members Have for Researchers

By Bo James Hwang | February 19, 2019
Post-Baccalaureate Pre-Medical Student, UCLA Extension

The All of Us Research Program, a project of the National Institutes of Health, aims to gather health data from one million people living in the United States. I was chosen to participate in one of the University of California, San Francisco’s research feedback sessions for the initiative.

Many of the trans and non-binary people participating in the feedback session discussed their personal experiences with medical providers and researchers. Many brought up the mistrust that trans people have for researchers. 

Tags: Community voices, LGBTQ, Transgender, Health equity, Ethics, Research

2. Better Condom Education for High School Students: Putting Data into Practice

By Mia Barrett, MEd | January 31, 2019
Research Associate, ETR

What are the most common errors high school students make about condom use? Thanks to some recent research by ETR and our partners with Public Health, Seattle & King County, we can share insights on that question. Because of what I’ve learned through this research, I’ve adapted the way I teach youth about condom use. 

Tags: Research to practice, Condoms, Research, Sexual and reproductive health, Health education

3. Three Ways to Rock a Recruitment Pitch for a Study

By ETR | January 8, 2019

ETR has a nationally recognized Research Department. Our multidisciplinary research team engages in research addressing a wide range of educational and public health issues.

One of the challenges in research is recruiting participants for studies. In work we did recently, our research assistants went to college classrooms. They delivered a five-minute “pitch” inviting students to participate in an online survey about their learning experiences.

Tags: Recruitment, College, Research

4. From the Ground into Our Schools: Parent/Guardian Awareness of Radon Levels

By Kirsten Martin | December 13, 2018
Third Year Medical Student, Larner College of Medicine at The University of Vermont

Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. In spite of this, 38 states have no legislation requiring that radon levels be monitored in schools. Vermont, where I currently reside, is one of these states.

Tags: Research, School health

5. Supporting Diversity & Inclusion: Harry Potter's Greatest Spell

By Elizabeth McDade-Montez, PhD, and Rebecca A. Dore, PhD  | November 13, 2018
Senior Research Associate, ETR (EM) and Senior Research Associate, The Ohio State University (RAD)

Harry Potter is the best-selling book series of all time. The books and their derivatives have made author J.K. Rowling the world’s first billionaire author. The novels and subsequent movies are certainly engaging and entertaining. Indeed, entertainment is the primary goal of most media and works of fiction.

But how we engage with fiction and media is a serious area of study for researchers in fields as diverse as psychology, education, literary studies, philosophy and communications. 

Tags: Reading, Stigma, Diversity and inclusion, Research
By Elizabeth McDade-Montez, PhD

6. Tech Guy Makes Good: More Substance, Less Tedium in Data Analysis

By David Manuel Torres | September 18, 2017
Research Assistant, ETR

I have always been really interested in technology. In elementary school, I looked forward to “computer lab” days where the class would spend an hour at the school’s small, modular classroom by the lunch area. We got to play computer games meant to develop our typing skills. After one of these computer lab days, the instructor pulled me aside and told me that she wanted me to help her install new mice on all the classroom computers in the school.

I was filled with pride. In the days following, I eagerly knocked on each classroom door and went in to unplug the old mechanical mice and install fancy new optical laser ones.

Tags: data analysis, Teamwork, Technology, Pair programming, Technology education, Research

7. 5 Things I've Learned in My First Year at ETR (and How These Have Further Shaped My Research Interests)

By Beverly Iniguez-Conrique | July 11, 2017
Research Assistant, ETR

This time a year ago, I was taking the last final exam of my undergraduate career! I was also preparing for the next chapter of my life as an ETRian in our Research/Science Department. Now that a year has gone by, I’m looking all over for where the time went. I guess time flies when you’re having fun!

Here are five things I’ve learned since being at ETR.

Tags: Sexual and reproductive health, STEM equity, Evaluation, Research

8. Why Have We Ignored Young Fathers?

By Taylor Vandenbossche, MPH | June 22, 2017
Graduate Research Intern, ETR

What comes to mind when you hear the words “young father”? I’ve noticed the narrative behind teen pregnancy often focuses solely on the thoughts and feelings of the mother. Funding and programs primarily serve teen moms.

So what about the young fathers? 

Tags: Research, Adolescent health, teen fathers, Teen parents

9. 2017 Kirby Summit Doesn't Disappoint

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES | May 24, 2017
Senior Editor, ETR

A group of developmental neuroscientists walks into a room. They sit down with some sexual health experts. They all talk about ways to support healthy adolescent development.

What happens then? As it turns out, some pretty amazing things.

Tags: Research, Kirby summit, Neuroscience, Developmental neuroscience, Sexual and reproductive health, Sexual risk reduction
By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES

10. Gender Differences in Math Ability: What's the Science Say?

By Katrina Hunter | April 25, 2017
Research Assistant, ETR

I was in a college calculus course. We were learning how to use quadrants and angles to solve functions.

People can either solve the function visually, or by calculating out their answer. As we were going through different problems, I was using the visual method to solve the function. My instructor commented that it was good that I could solve the equation that way, and that it was rare for women to be able to visualize the solutions. 

Tags: Research, Education research, STEM equity, STEM education, STEM, Gender, math education
By Katrina Hunter

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