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There are 11 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Computer science education".

1. Coding Boot Camps: Wish They'd Existed When I Was Studying Computer Science

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | February 28, 2018
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Why bother learning to write computer code? That’s a question I used to asked myself. I believe that many women are still asking this question. They don’t perceive the value of coding until they get into the workforce and discover a host of ways coding can increase the impact of their work.

This is just one more reason we should celebrate, support and advocate for the improvement of alternative computer science (CS) training grounds such as coding boot camps.

Tags: Coding boot camps, Computer science education, Diversity in technology
By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD

2. The Importance of Community Colleges in Diversifying Computing

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | February 8, 2018
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Finally! More and more attention is shifting to the fact that community colleges could play a critical role in diversifying computing fields.

The National Science Foundation and Google have given momentum to this movement by funding and hosting a workshop, the “Authentic Inclusion of Community Colleges in Broadening Participation in Computing.” It was held January 30-February 1, 2018, at the Google headquarters. 

Tags: STEM equity, STEM equity, Community college, Diversity in technology, Computer science education
By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD

3. Parent Engagement: Key for Girls in STEM

From an interview with Linda Kekelis, PhD | October 26, 2017
Principal, Linda Kekelis Consulting

We need girls in tech. We need women in tech. We need women and underrepresented minorities across all areas of STEM. There are good reasons for this, reasons that benefit society, industry, the economy and international competitiveness.

But for me, one of the most persuasive is simply that girls and women deserve the freedom and opportunity offered by access to STEM fields.

Tags: Girls in tech, Computer science education, Parent engagement, Technology education, K-12, STEM equity

4. The "Pipeline" to CS Careers: The Metaphor is Wrong

https://www.aacc.nche.edu/research-trends/fast-facts/By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | August 22, 2017
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Imagine a high school student who loves technology. She’s decided to pursue a career in computer science (CS). What steps will take her forward from school to career?

Planning for these steps is an essential part of the educational process, both for individual students and for educational institutions. Unfortunately, the current ways most institutions are thinking about the CS pipeline—or even the more flexible model of pathways—aren’t workable for a lot of students. 

Tags: Computer science education, Diversity in technology, Community college, Technology education

5. What Students Say: Taking Community College Pathways to Computer Science Degrees

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | December 1, 2016
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Why isn’t the tech field more diverse? And what can we do to change that?

One of the challenges is the so-called “pipeline” issue. We don’t have enough women and underrepresented minority students pursuing, and then completing, computer science degrees. That means we don’t have enough trained and skilled professionals to do all of the work that needs doing.

Tags: Diversity in technology, Computer science education, Community college, Underrepresented populations
By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD

6. In Search of Quality Computer Science Education for All: A New Framework Can Help

By Jill Denner, PhD | October 17, 2016
Senior Research Scientist, ETR

Computer science for all? If you’ve been reading the headlines, you have seen the explosion of articles. Proponents argue we must offer computer science (CS) education to all students, in a combination of school and afterschool programs. At first glance, making CS available to all sounds like a great idea. But there have been concerns about what this looks like in practice.

Tags: Diversity in technology, Computer science education, Computer science for all, Education standards
By Jill Denner, PhD

7. Pair Programming: 10 Cool Tips to Make It Work in Your Classrooms

By Shannon Campe | August 2, 2016
Research Associate, ETR

Fifteen years ago, ETR started working with middle school girls to help them build computer programming skills and confidence. This was Girls Creating Games, a project where girls designed and programmed their own games. It was one of the earliest projects in our Diversity in IT group.

In the world of technology professions, females, Blacks and Latinos continue to be substantially underrepresented. Through partnerships, consulting and research projects like Girls Creating Games and The Girl Game Company, we have designed and supported efforts to increase diversity in STEM fields. (Find out more about the research we’ve done, and a list of our group’s publications, here.)

One of the strategies we’ve frequently used and studied is pair programming. We’ve developed some classroom tips that can make pair programming more effective.

Find out about our free tip sheets on increasing diversity in STEM education here.
Tags: Research, Pair programming, Computer science education, Diversity in technology
By Shannon Campe

8. Looking to the Future: Educational Research and AERA16

By Julie Adams | May 25, 2016
Research Assistant, ETR

The 2016 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting was held in Washington, DC last month. It marked the 100th anniversary of education researchers meeting to talk about current issues in education, research and policy. As a first-time attendee, I was inspired to see so many people gather in one place, all dedicated to improving the future of education.

I’ve been reflecting on the information shared by some of the most notable researchers in the field over the course of those five exciting days. Here are three ideas I believe are essential to keep in mind as I continue my career in research.

Tags: Research, Education research, Diversity in technology, Computer science education
By Julie Adams

9. Diversity in Computer Science? We Need to Look at Institutional Barriers to Getting a Degree

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | April 19, 2016
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Getting a degree in computer science can be tough. In the name of “rigor,” computer science and related fields have established a structured hierarchy of course prerequisites. These need to be taken in a specific sequence. Often, however, the necessary classes aren’t offered every term. This situation forces college students to plan their schedules carefully or risk being delayed in their education.

I have sat in on many faculty meetings watching heated debates about how much math, science and computer science should be required of college graduates claiming a computer science major. But what are the implications of these decisions for who persists in computer science? And how much of this is truly necessary to prepare students for the current workplace versus simply keeping things the way they have always been?

Or, as I have been asking lately, is this about maintaining “rigor,” or just keeping out the “riff raff”?

Tags: Diversity in technology, STEM, Computer science education
By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD

10. Coding Is Cool, But What About Teacher Education and Effective Curriculum Design?

By Betül Czerkawski, PhD | November 13, 2015
Associate Professor of Educational Technology, University of Arizona

In recent years there has been a strong emphasis on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education for a number of reasons. Strong STEM education allows us to:

  • Train the workforce we need for the digital era
  • Solve pressing and complex problems of our new digital world
  • Compete economically with other nations
  • Increase scientific research that will lead to innovation in all fields

STEM education has two key foci that provide support to all of these outcomes. The first is training new generations in STEM professions. How do we make sure our children and youth are ready to step up and lead in these fields?

The second is implementing strategies that develop computational thinking (CT) skills in all students—even those who are not planning to select STEM-related professions themselves.

Tags: Research, Evaluation, STEM, Computer science education, Computational thinking, Teachers, Instructional design

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