What's Happening

Check out what our people and partners are researching, thinking, reading, writing, watching and doing! (Note: The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ETR as an agency.)


Having Real Talks with Teens: A Roadmap to Better Communication
October 6, 2016

Having Real Talks with Teens: A Roadmap to Better Communication

By Jennifer Salerno, DNP | October 6, 2016
Founder, Possibilities for Change

Whether you’re a parent or an individual who works with youth, you are placed in an influential role to help keep teens safe and healthy. But that’s no easy task!

Risky behaviors account for the majority of teen injury and premature death. In the face of these challenges, educators, providers and parents need concrete strategies to support teens in smart decision making.

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Tags: Communication, Teens, Parents, Risk reduction
Partnering Up for School Success: Getting More Physical Activity Into the Mix
September 13, 2016

Partnering Up for School Success: Getting More Physical Activity Into the Mix

By Kymm Ballard, EdD | September 13, 2016
Executive Director, SPARK

Ask an educator, “What do you most want for your students?” Chances are the answer will be, “Success.”

The math teacher wants students to master the concepts in the semester’s curriculum. The health education teacher wants students to learn how to establish healthy habits and make good choices about risks. The PE teacher might focus on building sports skills and encouraging a commitment to lifelong physical activity. The principal might address a combination of academic learning and positive social connection.

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Tags: K-12, School health, Physical activity, Obesity, School health education
Including LGBTQ Youth in Pregnancy Prevention: How to Make It Work
August 25, 2016

Including LGBTQ Youth in Pregnancy Prevention: How to Make It Work

By Cassidey Streber, MA | August 25, 2016
Program Coordinator, Youth Services of Tulsa, Adolescent Health/PregNOT

A student I’ll call Shay came in and sat at the back of my classroom. It was the first class meeting. Other students came bounding in, adding a bit of lively chaos to the mix.

I surveyed the students as they settled and we got started. I took note of Shay in particular. Shoulders up. Sighing. Arms crossed. Uncrossed. Looking out the window. Scribbling on a piece of paper. Not interacting with other students. Not looking at me. Not really there.

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Tags: LGBTQ, Inclusive education, LGBTQ youth, Pregnancy prevention, Sexual and reproductive health
Healing and Justice Matter
July 11, 2016

Healing and Justice Matter

By Robin Perlas | July 11, 2016
Training Coordinator, ETR

Last week will go down in history as one of the bloodiest in US history. In the few days following our nation’s Independence Day holiday weekend, racially-charged gun violence took the lives of a number of civilians as well as five police officers. Investigations are ongoing and many facts remain to be uncovered. What we do know is that a lot of people are in mourning, and our country is once again divided at its core.

By Robin Perlas
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Tags: Social justice, Violence prevention, Public health
LGBTQ Pride: It's a Public Health Issue
June 27, 2016

LGBTQ Pride: It's a Public Health Issue

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES | June 27, 2016
Senior Editor, ETR

The entire month of June is celebrated the world over as LGBTQ Pride month. This year, I started the celebration June 6 in my hometown of Santa Cruz, California. A few hundred marchers walked about a quarter of a mile along our downtown avenue, cheered on by neighbors and friends.

There were plenty of families and kids, dogs, bubbles, fairy wings and rainbow-themed accessories. The parade was over in 45 minutes. It was lovely and low-key. My wife and I talked about the easy-going vibe of the festival. The LGBTQ community achieved nationally recognized marriage equality in 2015, and now, in 2016, the fire and fury seemed to have quieted down.

And then Orlando happened.

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES
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Tags: LGBTQ, Pride, Social determinants of health, Social justice
Preventing Sexual Violence: Notes from Our Blog
June 15, 2016

Preventing Sexual Violence: Notes from Our Blog

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES | June 15, 2016
Senior Editor, ETR

Our nation has been engaged in a vital dialogue over the past couple of weeks about sexual violence. The so-called “Stanford rape case” has people talking about risk, responsibility and consequences. It has also shined a light on some of the particular issues related to sexual violence on college campuses.

This seemed like a good moment to take a look at some past posts from the ETR blog addressing the prevention of sexual violence.

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES
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Tags: Research, Sexual violence prevention
We Stand with Orlando
June 13, 2016

We Stand with Orlando

By ETR | June 13, 2016

Like others all around the world, we are stunned and devastated by this past weekend’s events in Orlando.

We stand with the people of Orlando and the LGBTQ community there. We stand with LGBTQ communities across the nation, and with all who cherish freedom, liberty and justice.

Our hearts are broken, but our will is undeterred. Peace to Orlando. Peace to us all.

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"Out of the Office": Keeping Our Sanity at Work
June 9, 2016

"Out of the Office": Keeping Our Sanity at Work

By BA Laris, MPH | June 9, 2016
Research Associate, ETR

How do we keep our sanity at work? How many times have you heard that question?

How do we provide the best services and products possible? How do we meet the needs of our clients and customers? Our co-workers, our supervisors? Our Board of Directors and funders? How do we do all this and still maintain a healthy family and social life?

Yes. I admit it. I use my “out of the office” message regularly!

The first week of June every year, I spend seven days on my bicycle, riding with over 2,000 other cyclists. We travel the 545 miles from San Francisco to Los Angeles as part of AIDS Lifecycle. We raise money and awareness in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

By B.A. Laris, MPH
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Tags: HIV-AIDS, Self care, Volunteer
Our Future: Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health & Wellbeing
June 7, 2016

Our Future: Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health & Wellbeing

By Amy Peterson, MSc | June 6, 2016
Project Coordinator, ETR

A few weeks ago I attended a symposium on the Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing in London. The symposium marked the launch of the third and most comprehensive report the Commission has produced on the state of global adolescent health.

With over 1.8 billion young people aged 10-24 years old in the world, the promotion of healthy adolescents could have huge benefits to social and economic outcomes globally. Yet, historically, adolescents have largely been left out. They’ve lacked representation in global health indicators and a voice in the conversation about their own health and well-being.

The Lancet Commission represents a shift in the way we frame adolescent health. It elevates the importance of social determinants of health and young people's right to participate in the health discourse.

This Commission resonates and aligns with ETR’s work in the area of adolescent health, particularly sexual and reproductive health. In the report, as in ETR’s work, social determinants and neurodevelopment play a significant role in the discussion.

By Amy Peterson, MSc
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Tags: Youth, Youth voice, Adolescent health, Global issues, Neurodevelopment, Kirby summit
Honor, Advocacy, Activism: National Caribbean-American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
June 6, 2016

Honor, Advocacy, Activism: National Caribbean-American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

By Donald Powell, MHS | June 6, 2016
Senior Director of Policy & Development, Exponents

When I was first asked to prepare something to commemorate National Caribbean-American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, I jumped at the opportunity. After all, writing has always been my primary way to educate, process emotions and create.

But as I sat at my computer, I began to feel a little apprehensive. As an African American man with southern origins, I started to second guess my right to attempt this endeavor. Was I the person to speak to this commemoration?

I have worked as an HIV preventionist for more than two decades. In that time, I’ve had the opportunity to work alongside several powerful men and women of Caribbean descent. They have transformed and enhanced my understanding of how the intersection of ethnicity, HIV, gender identity and sexual orientation often plays out in Caribbean communities, and in other Black American communities as well. So I speak today to honor the achievements of this community and what I have learned from them.

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Tags: National Caribbean-American HIV-AIDS Awareness Day, HIV-AIDS, HIV, Community Impact Solutions Project, HIV prevention
Preventing Teen Pregnancy: Sharing a Message of Hope and Resilience
June 2, 2016

Preventing Teen Pregnancy: Sharing a Message of Hope and Resilience

By Raymond Blossom | June 2, 2016
Prevention Supervisor, Touchstone Health Services Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

Note: Raymond Blossom participated in a recent training delivered by ETR Professional Development staff. We asked him to share some of his reflections after the event.

I grew up in the South Bay area of San Diego, California. There is a lot to witness there, a lot to learn and a lot to take in.

It is true there are beautiful beaches and weather that makes you never want to leave. But outside looking in, you may not see the lives lost too often to gang violence, families struggling to make ends meet, and the lack of opportunity for many young men and women.

As a teen, some of my closest friends were becoming parents before high school graduation. I never imagined I would one day have the opportunity to teach prevention and sexual health to teens, and to let young men and women know they do not have to become a statistic. 

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Tags: Teens, Pregnancy prevention, Professional development
Say It With Research: 4 Ways to Deliver Effective STD Messaging for Youth
May 19, 2016

Say It With Research: 4 Ways to Deliver Effective STD Messaging for Youth

By Cody Sigel, MPH, CHES | May 19, 2016
Professional Development Consultant, ETR

The history of sex education in the United States is fraught with horror stories, from fear-based tactics to blatant misinformation. Sadly, ineffective sex education is not a thing of the past. A recent CDC report shows that most middle and high schools around the country are not implementing effective approaches to sexuality education. It’s no surprise that statistics about the impact of STDs on young people are discouraging.

By Cody Sigel, MPH, CHES
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Tags: STDs, STD prevention, Research, Evidence-informed interventions, Youth
Currently Reading: Thinking Outside the Binary Gender Box
May 16, 2016

Currently Reading: Thinking Outside the Binary Gender Box

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES | May 16, 2016
Senior Editor, ETR

My car rolled to a stop at a crosswalk. A young man strode across my path. Even with my tired, end-of-a-long-workday brain, I noticed his confident bearing. He stared ahead, eyes slightly narrowed. His cap was pulled low on his forehead.

And then I did a double take. The young man was actually a client in my psychotherapy practice—a young lesbian I had just seen in a session. She glanced my way, smiled and nodded, and we both moved on.

A post by Emmie Matsuno on the Psychology Benefits Society blog (American Psychological Association) brought this memory, and that client, to mind. It’s titled, “Are You a Boy or Girl? No: Living Outside the Gender Binary.”

By Marcia Quackenbush, MS, MFT, MCHES
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Tags: LGBTQ, Gender fluid, Transgender issues
New Research: Keys to Understanding Adolescent Romantic Relationships
May 9, 2016

New Research: Keys to Understanding Adolescent Romantic Relationships

By Thao Ha, PhD | May 9, 2016
Assistant Research Professor, Arizona State University

Know any teens who’ve fallen in love lately? Chances are that you do. Most teenagers have been in love or have been involved in a serious romantic relationship by age 18 (Carver, Joyner & Udry). While teens often do not share their romantic experiences with adults, those of us working with adolescents—educators, health providers, researchers, community workers—need the best understanding possible of young people’s romantic relationships. 

 

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Tags: Romantic relationships, Adolescents, Mental health, Risk reduction
How One School Is Creating a Gender-Inclusive Environment: A Parent's Perspective
May 3, 2016

How One School Is Creating a Gender-Inclusive Environment: A Parent's Perspective

By Laura Norvig, MLIS | May 3, 2016
Digital Media Strategies, ETR

During my first 12 years at ETR, I worked on a project that had little to do with sexual and reproductive health. Still, ETR being an organization that does a lot of work in that field, I got used to seeing things around the office such as a box full of wooden condom demonstrators (i.e., penis models), or a giant drawing of an anatomically correct vulva on a designer’s computer screen.

Since ETR started blogging, I’ve really enjoyed reading more about the work my colleagues and our partners do. Michael Everett’s deeply thoughtful piece about Black men who have sex with men and who also happen to be HIV service providers was a window into a new world. Luca Maurer’s post about training educators and service providers on transgender issues opened my eyes to a very real problem: “traditional approaches in education and service provision have rarely incorporated strategies that include or affirm transgender people.”

Sometimes, though, I feel I just don’t know enough about some of the populations ETR’s materials and trainings are designed to help. Hey, I’m a cisgender over-fifty mom. Like a lot of people in this country, I get most of my impressions of transgender people from fictional and reality TV shows like I Am Cait, I Am Jazz, and Transparent.

By Laura Norvig
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Tags: K-12, School health, Gender, Transgender issues, Parents
WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 4: Vanessa Johnson
April 28, 2016

WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 4: Vanessa Johnson

By Vanessa Johnson, JD, with Jacqueline Peters | April 28, 2016
Director, Ribbon Consulting Group

Jacqueline Peters: This is the fourth in a series of posts about women who have chosen to become trainers and facilitators for the CDC’s WILLOW program. I hope you’ll take a look at Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 as well. These women are inspiring!

Vanessa Johnson: My personal fight with HIV is tied to the loss of family members, friends and co-workers in the 25 years since I was first diagnosed myself. It is in their memory, and because of my own motivation to live the best life I can, that I am involved in the field. My journey has taken me beyond the disease itself. I am exploring and advocating for the essential services we need to keep our communities disease-free and offer protections for people who are still severely stigmatized.

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Tags: Womens Health, HIV-AIDS, WILLOW program, HIV, Community Impact Solutions Project
WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 3: Tina Murphy
April 27, 2016

WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 3: Tina Murphy

By Christina Murphy, with Jacqueline Peters | April 27, 2016
HIV Navigator, Indigenous Peoples Task Force

Jacqueline Peters: In Part 1 of this blog post, I described some of my experiences as a trainer for the WILLOW training of facilitators in Atlanta. In Part 2, I asked Alesia Miller to share some of her thoughts about the experience and the program. Today we hear from another participant, Tina Murphy.

Christina Murphy: It has always been my passion and calling to be in the service of helping others, in all communities, especially in our communities of color. I care deeply about the ongoing health disparities and social justice issues we all continue to face. My journey started with Tobacco Prevention/Cessation. It continues to build on that foundation, and now I am doing HIV prevention work.

By Jacqueline Peters
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Tags: Womens Health, HIV-AIDS, HIV, WILLOW program, CDC, Community Impact Solutions Project
WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 2: Alesia
April 22, 2016

WILLOW Women on the HIV Front Lines, Part 2: Alesia

By Alesia Miller with Jacqueline Peters | April 22, 2016
Willow Leader, Empower U & Trainer, ETR

Jacqueline Peters: In Part 1 of this blog post, I described some of my experiences as a trainer for the WILLOW training of facilitators in Atlanta. I asked one of the participants, Alesia Miller, to share some of her thoughts about the experience and the program.

Alesia Miller: My motivation to be a WILLOW leader has changed from the beginning up to now. As I continue along in this process, I've experineced the changes of how this disease is experienced by the newly diagnosed versus the long term survivors.

By Jacqueline Peters
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Tags: HIV-AIDS, HIV, WILLOW program, Community Impact Solutions Project
WILLOW Women On the HIV Front Lines
April 21, 2016

WILLOW Women On the HIV Front Lines

By Jacqueline Peters | April 21, 2016
Logistics Specialist & WILLOW Trainer, ETR

I am an excited and fortunate woman. I recently completed the process to become a Certified Trainer for the WILLOW program. I’m meeting some incredible people and being given the opportunity to make a genuine difference in the HIV prevention effort. And after my experiences so far, I know one thing for certain. In WILLOW, people have stories to tell. 

By Jacqueline Peters
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Tags: HIV-AIDS, Community Impact Solutions Project, HIV, Women, WILLOW, Training of trainers
Diversity in Computer Science? We Need to Look at Institutional Barriers to Getting a Degree
April 19, 2016

Diversity in Computer Science? We Need to Look at Institutional Barriers to Getting a Degree

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | April 19, 2016
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Getting a degree in computer science can be tough. In the name of “rigor,” computer science and related fields have established a structured hierarchy of course prerequisites. These need to be taken in a specific sequence. Often, however, the necessary classes aren’t offered every term. This situation forces college students to plan their schedules carefully or risk being delayed in their education.

I have sat in on many faculty meetings watching heated debates about how much math, science and computer science should be required of college graduates claiming a computer science major. But what are the implications of these decisions for who persists in computer science? And how much of this is truly necessary to prepare students for the current workplace versus simply keeping things the way they have always been?

Or, as I have been asking lately, is this about maintaining “rigor,” or just keeping out the “riff raff”?

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD
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Tags: Diversity in technology, STEM, Computer science education

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