Program Success Center

for Sexual & Reproductive Health

Program Enrichment Sessions

ETR offers tailored professional learning through skill-building training and information sessions. These options are designed to support teen pregnancy prevention and other programs during the implementation stage and to boost and support program success.

For more information, contact one of our training experts through our Program Support Help Desk.

Evaluation Results | Program Adaptations | Sustainability | Facilitation | Senstive Issues | Adolescent Brain  | LGBTQ Youth | Parent-Child Connectedness | Science of Learning | Youth Resiliency | SRH 101 | LARCs | TA Delivery | Teams | Program Planning


Communicating Evaluation Results

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Describe strategies for tailoring communication messages to different audiences
  • Describe key principles for communicating evaluation results effectively
  • Create a communication plan to disseminate evaluation results
  • Identify at least two innovative reporting techniques for evaluation results
  • Practice using data visualization tips for presenting data to stakeholders

Program evaluations generate very valuable data about the successes, strengths or gaps of programmatic efforts. However, effectively communicating these data to others is often neglected. Communication is key to promoting and sustaining teen pregnancy prevention programs. How can we best use evaluation data to learn, to inspire, or to persuade others?

This training focuses on how to use evaluation data beyond just reporting back to funders. Participants describe key principles for strategic communication, including the communication of evaluation results to multiple stakeholders and audiences. They apply this learning by developing a communication plan for their own programs. In the afternoon, participants identify innovative data visualization and reporting techniques, focusing primarily on written materials and slide presentations. They practice using these techniques to communicate evaluation data from their own program.

Overall, participants will learn by doing. The trainer presents research-based principles and strategies, and then participants apply these strategies with hands-on activities, discussions and reflections. Written tip sheets and examples, as well as a reference list, are provided.

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Embracing Adaptations: the Pathway to Program Success

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Define adaptation and fidelity
  • Describe the core components of the EBP of choice
  • Apply appropriate green light adaptations to EBPs to optimize program success while maintaining fidelity
  • Apply the principles of Red, Yellow, and Green light adaptations to relevant adaptation scenarios
  • Identify adaptation resources and technical assistance opportunities

Making adaptations to Evidence-Based Programs (EBP), when done strategically, will strengthen the interventions.  Appropriately integrating green light adaptations can increase inclusivity, align the EBP more appropriately with community needs and values, and, ultimately, increase efficacy.  Using a science-based skill-building approach, ETR’s one-day adaptation training is designed to equip participants with the knowledge and skills needed to make appropriate adaptations, while still implementing the EBP with fidelity. A range of topics is covered, including the basic principles of fidelity, the core components of EBPs, guidelines for Red, Yellow, and Green Light adaptations, and how to strategically integrate adaptations in your chosen intervention.

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Sustaining Teen Pregnancy & HIV Prevention Programs

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the concept of sustainability and why it’s important
  • State the factors that promote program sustainability
  • Conduct an organizational assessment to prepare for program sustainability
  • Identify characteristics of effective partnerships that can enhance program sustainability
  • Create a resource development plan
  • Implement a plan of action for increasing their program’s sustainability

Research in the area of program sustainability has shown that there are concrete steps to take to increase the longevity of programs. In this training, participants identify key factors that can increase their program's odds of sustainability.

The facilitator guides participants through sustainability planning steps, including conducting a sustainability capacity assessment, prioritizing program components to continue in the case of reduced funding, and developing a sustainability plan. Participants also consider how strategic partnerships can facilitate program sustainability. Innovative strategies for seeking alternative funding sources are discussed, and participants create a resource development action plan.

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Reaching the Adult Learner: The Science & Art of Masterful Facilitation

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the research-based elements of effective training design and delivery
  • Identify best practices for reaching adult learners
  • Adopt a variety of facilitation techniques and strategies that engage and motivate learners
  • Employ strategies to manage discouraged and/or resistant participants
  • Identify resources for further study and practice
  • Initiate a personal plan of action to strengthen their facilitation skills

This session is intended for those who work with adult learners who wish to create a powerful learning environment that results in clients taking action. With adult learners, it’s often clear what to present, but how to present it may be more challenging.

Participants explore the latest in professional development research, learning theory and brain research as it relates to the adult learner to help them understanding how the human brain acquires, retains and applies information. They examine proven models and strategies for designing effective events, facilitating diverse groups, and motivating learners to take action. In addition, in the longer session, participants review and practice best strategies for managing and preventing difficult training issues, including resistant or unengaged participants.

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Managing Sensitive Issues: Effectively Responding to Controversy

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Identify a range of personal and community-based values
  • Explore a set of effective facilitative techniques for addressing difficult issues
  • Practice using the techniques to effectively answer a variety of difficult questions
  • Practice using the techniques to effectively respond to harassing/bullying comments
  • Develop a personal plan of action to master the facilitative practices

Educators and others who work with youth often feel anxious about addressing sensitive issues—defined as those topics associated with strong personal values—in the classroom, whether they are part of a curriculum or surface in a general class discussion. Sexuality, alcohol and other drugs, politics, race and bullying are just a few examples of issues that, if not handled sensitively, could result in alienated students or angry parents contacting the school or agency. The most common topic targeted in this training is sexuality education, but the focus can be adjusted, based on participants' needs.

Participants identify the sensitive topics they face in their workplace, and have the opportunity to assess their personal values, consider student diversity and build the skills needed to answer difficult questions. The facilitator shares a set of proven strategies for responding to questions related to sensitive topics and harassing/bullying statements, and participants practice effective responses to build their skills.

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Understanding the Adolescent Brain

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the unique developmental features of the adolescent brain and the implications for adolescent cognition and behavior
  • Describe current research on factors that influence the developing adolescent brain, including sleep, substances, stress and technology
  • Identify strategies that draw upon brain research to engage the adolescent learner in avoiding risk behaviors
  • Implement a personal plan of action for refining their skills in effectively engaging adolescent learners

During this session, participants learn about neurobiological findings from adolescent brain research as they apply to cognitive and behavioral changes—risk taking, relationship building and social development. In addition, the facilitators describe findings in emerging fields informed by neuroscience, such as the effects of sleep, technology and stress on the developing brain.

Based on the findings outlined, participants explore some unique teaching and learning strategies for reaching adolescents, all linked to cognitive engagement, impulse control and decision making. They identify a set of adult behaviors and attitudes that might best engage, influence and motivate teens, and are strongly encouraged to make a shift in how they think about and approach the adolescent learner.

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Addressing the Needs of LGBTQ Youth

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Examine the key theories and terminology around gender identity/expression and sexual orientation
  • Define the stages of “coming out,” i.e. self-awareness and identity disclosure
  • Identify increased risk factors for LGBTQ youth
  • Strategize effective ways to work with and support LGBTQ youth
  • Identify resources for LGBTQ youth
  • Develop a personal plan of action for positively addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth

The ability to provide services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning (LGBTQ) youth begins with an understanding of the nature of gender and sexual orientation, correct terminology, basic knowledge of the “typical” experiences of the population, and an awareness of the increased risk factors experienced by these youth. In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to explore this important content and identify strategies for providing welcoming and affirming services appropriate for LGBTQ youth.

The facilitator shares an overview of the theory, current issues and research-based strategies important when working with LGBTQ populations. Participants then begin to identify practices that support effective service design and delivery and will lead to the most inclusive and impactful practices. Participants also strategize ways to incorporate these practices into their services and settings.

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Parent-Child Connectedness

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how parent-child connectedness (PCC) functions as an important protective factor against adolescent pregnancy and other negative adolescent health outcomes
  • Identify key parent behaviors associated with PCC and the determinants of those behaviors
  • Explain how intervention activities can be used to strengthen PCC
  • Identify at least one action they will take to incorporate PCC into their current work

Findings from adolescent health research have demonstrated that parent involvement and connectedness are important factors in the timing and riskiness of adolescent sexual behavior. Parental involvement activities, including parent-child communication, parental monitoring and parents' involvement in their children’s day-to-day activities, are associated with delayed sexual initiation, lower frequency of sexual activity, a reduction in sexual partners, and an increase in the use of condoms and contraception. Interventions that include parental components can have an impact on sexual health and behavior outcomes.

This training enhances the ability of professionals working in teen pregnancy prevention to involve parents of adolescents in their programs. The session begins with an overview of the research supporting parent involvement in adolescent sexual health programs, including the impact of PCC on adolescent outcomes and parent behaviors associated with PCC. Participants then explore different activities for incorporating parents into teen pregnancy prevention, and discuss strategies for overcoming challenges to integrating activities into their existing programs.

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The Science of Learning

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the key theory and research-based practices for reaching and motivating learners
  • Explore tools and templates that strengthen the learner’s capacity for change
  • Apply practices to effective delivery modes (face-to-face and distance learning)
  • Commit to at least one action step that will strengthen their work.

Even the most well-intented programs, regardless of delivery mode, will fail unless the instructional design and the learning “culture” include critical ingredients that motivate learners to change, such as relevant content, interactivity, practice, a culture of high challenge with low threat, and planning for transfer.

In this training, the facilitator shares a fresh look at the theory and research-based practices that support effective instructional design and delivery that lead to change or the intent to change, and applies those practices to various modes of delivery, including a blended-learning approach that combines face-to-face and online learning. Current professional development research, neuroscience and change theory, as well as practical experience, provide the background for the session content, and findings from a current ETR literature search published in the journal Professional Development in Education are highlighted.

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Strategies to Foster Youth Resiliency

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how positive youth development can improve youth outcomes
  • Examine personal attitudes about what it means for a young person to be resilient
  • Identify individual qualities associated with resiliency in youth
  • Identify individual educator strategies and agency-level support structures that build resiliency in diverse groups of youth
  • Implement an action plan for developing strengths and improving support structures in existing youth programs

Studies of adverse childhood experiences confirm what many of us know from working with young people—children raised in adverse environments are more likely to experience negative developmental outcomes, including teen pregnancy. However, many young people thrive despite the odds. What makes these young people resilient, and what can youth-serving professionals do to help foster resiliency through sexual and reproductive health programs?

This workshop is dedicated to answering these important questions. Participants review current trends in resiliency research, including the connection between resiliency and positive youth development, and examine personal attitudes around what it means to be resilient across different cultural contexts. They explore factors that make young people resilient and develop new strategies for fostering resiliency among youth, including using strengths-based facilitation and implementing support structures.

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Sexual & Reproductive Health 101

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Describe protective and risk factors, including stigma, associated with adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections
  • Describe youth-friendly resources related to adolescent sexual and reproductive health
  • Communicate useful and relevant content about anatomy, physiology, contraception and sexually transmitted infections
  • Apply a variety of strategies and activities for teaching sexual and reproductive health
  • Address how values and attitudes affect teaching sexual and reproductive health
  • Implement action steps to engage with the school and community to deliver high quality sexual and reproductive education

New to teaching sexual and reproductive health education? Need a refresher? This highly interactive training prepares participants to teach sexual and reproductive health topics to youth.

Participants discover new ways to engage youth in learning about anatomy, physiology, contraception and sexually transmitted infections. They also explore how values influence teaching of sensitive topics and practice answering common student questions. Facilitators also work with participants to help them understand local and state sexual health education policies and strengthen their role as a critical resource for youth.

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Strategies to Reduce Unintended Teen Pregnancy Through Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC)

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • State the rationale and research base for adolescent use of long-acting reversible contraception
  • Distinguish myths and misconceptions about adolescent use of long-acting reversible contraception
  • Describe four types of long-acting reversible contraception and their advantages for adolescents and young adults
  • Apply LARC-related health promotion strategies to existing programs

Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods have the potential to significantly reduce unintended pregnancy among young people. However, misconceptions related to LARC methods and their use by adolescents has prevented young people from receiving adequate information about LARCs.

In this training, facilitators use learner-centered, interactive techniques to discuss the rationale and research base for providing LARC information to young people. Participants review the most up-to-date clinical information about LARC methods, and build their capacity to implement health promotion strategies related to LARCs.

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The Effective Delivery of Technical Assistance

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • State the rationale and research base for providing tailored technical assistance
  • Identify the critical phases (or stages) in delivering effective technical assistance
  • Develop a program-specific TA protocol, tailored to their work and based on best practice
  • Apply the TA research and critical phases to deliver effective TA to clients
  • Use facilitative strategies to optimize a trustful and collaborative relationship with TA requestors
  • Develop an efficient TA logging system that generates results that meet program objectives and inform program improvement
  • Implement at least two action steps that will strengthen their skill in providing effective TA

Technical assistance (TA) is a commonly employed form of professional development, but is often implemented without the critical elements to make it effective. This online professional learning offering trains technical assistance providers in the research base and best practices for delivering effective TA, using ETR’s Effective Delivery of Technical Assistance: A Toolkit.

This professional learning has been designed as a 4-part process, including an online live event. Through this distributive learning process, facilitators will use learner-centered, interactive techniques to discuss the rationale and research base for providing tailored TA, review the critical phases in delivering effective TA and present helpful protocols and templates that can be modified for existing programs. Participants will walk away with research-based tools and solutions to real-time TA challenges to apply in their own settings and programs.

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Team Fitness: Strategies for Developing High-Functioning Teams

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the implications of their personal/work style when working with team members;
  • Complete a self-assessment to determine areas of strength and areas for improvement;
  • Collaboratively develop and commit to:
    • A set of team operating agreements,
    • A decision-making process,
    • A team communication plan, and
    • A team conflict management plan;
  • Identify strategies to avoid five common team obstacles that hinder team growth and development;
  • Commit to a standardized meeting management plan; and
  • Commit to a personal and team plan of action.

The level of effectiveness in teams is central to organizational/program success. The intent of this learning session is to provide practical, targeted guidance and tools to enhance the day-to-day tasks and responsibilities of program teams. This workshop will be highly interactive and will include a set of useful tools and guidance documents. An action plan with detailed tasks and a timeline will be created during the workshop and distributed to the group. When these skills and tools are used effectively, teams can expect to see improved communication, reduced and/or effectively managed conflict, increased trust, as well as increased productivity. A resource list for further study and exploration of team-building strategies will be provided.

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Program (Strategic) Planning

Objectives

As a result of this professional development process, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the purpose of the program planning process.
  • Differentiate program goals, strategies, objectives and activities.
  • Utilize the six steps of the planning process, and aligned resources.
  • Guide key stakeholders through a planning process.
  • Execute an action-centered planning process.

Program (strategic) planning is a process that results in decisions and actions to guide what your program is, what is does, and why it does it (Byson, 2004). The intent of this learning process is to guide participants through a practical process of assessing current program strengths and weaknesses and planning for adapting products, services and activities to best meet the needs of your target group. The process will include guidance on using resources effectively, understanding program context, decision-making, stakeholder communication, and improved program effectiveness. Note that this process embraces change theory, is action oriented, and results in a dynamic approach to program implementation (rather than a multi-page strategic plan that sits on a shelf).

—Byson, J.M. (2004). Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

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