What's Happening

Check out what our people and partners are researching, thinking, reading, writing, watching and doing!

(Note: Opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ETR as an agency.)

The “Pipeline” to CS Careers: The Metaphor is Wrong
August 22, 2017
The “Pipeline” to CS Careers: The Metaphor is Wrong

By Louise Ann Lyon, PhD | August 22, 2017
Senior Research Associate, ETR

Imagine a high school student who loves technology. She’s decided to pursue a career in computer science (CS). What steps will take her forward from school to career?

Planning for these steps is an essential part of the educational process, both for individual students and for educational institutions. Unfortunately, the current ways most institutions are thinking about the CS pipeline—or even the more flexible model of pathways—aren’t workable for a lot of students. 

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Tags: Technology education, Community college, Diversity in technology, Computer science education
Gender Differences in Math Ability: What’s the Science Say?
April 25, 2017
Gender Differences in Math Ability: What’s the Science Say?

By Katrina Hunter | April 25, 2017
Research Assistant, ETR

I was in a college calculus course. We were learning how to use quadrants and angles to solve functions.

People can either solve the function visually, or by calculating out their answer. As we were going through different problems, I was using the visual method to solve the function. My instructor commented that it was good that I could solve the equation that way, and that it was rare for women to be able to visualize the solutions. 

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Tags: Research, Education research, STEM equity, STEM education, STEM, Gender, math education
How Teaching Helped Me Be a Better Researcher
March 30, 2017
How Teaching Helped Me Be a Better Researcher

By Emily Green, MA | March 30 2017
Research Assistant, ETR

There is something about being a teacher that you carry with you, even if you transition to something else. I didn’t expect to become a K-12 science teacher, but I loved doing it. Now, I find myself being a teacher in everything I do. It gets into your blood. It changes the way you think. And I cannot thank my students enough for changing me in this way.

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Tags: Research, Science, Science education, Special needs students, math education
Building Math Confidence: It Takes Math to Make a STEM Career
October 4, 2016
Building Math Confidence: It Takes Math to Make a STEM Career

By Eloy Ortiz, MURP | October 4, 2016
Research Associate, ETR

Our nation has a vital interest in building a better pipeline to careers in STEM. However, females, Blacks and Latinos are substantially underrepresented in tech professions. ETR has had a longstanding commitment to exploring ways to boost the presence of women and underrepresented minorities in the tech world. A number of our research projects explore strategies to support a more diverse presence in the field.

Our Math Pathways project seeks to provide some pieces in the puzzle of identifying the factors that will help Latino students succeed in math. We know it’s important to build and sustain math confidence early in children’s education. Most students who decide to focus on STEM studies make that choice during high school, and increasingly, STEM competence is seen as a necessary emphasis for all students, from pre-K through grade 12.

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Tags: Research, Diversity in technology, Math confidence, Math Pathways, Family influence, math education
Extra Innings: Using a Video Game and Baseball to Teach Science and Math
September 15, 2016
Extra Innings: Using a Video Game and Baseball to Teach Science and Math

By Erica Marsh | September 15, 2016
Project Coordinator, ETR

Extra Innings is a new project which will be building a mobile video game to teach math and science. It’s a collaboration between ETR, dfusion and Science of Sport.

What’s new and different about it? We’re using a curriculum called Science of Baseball as the foundation, and we’ll be doing a formal evaluation of its efficacy.

The existing Science of Baseball curriculum represents a collaboration between Science of Sport, Major League Baseball, and several MLB franchises, including the Arizona Diamondbacks. It empowers students to improve academic performance and confidence in science and math through experiential learning of baseball concepts.

So let’s play ball! We hope to show that curve balls and strike zones blend very nicely with geometry, biomechanics, data visualization, aerodynamics and other STEM topics.

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Tags: Research, STEM, STEM education, Baseball, Mobile apps, math education